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Sugar Syrup for Indian Sweets, How to make it?
Chasni or Chashni

Mamta Gupta

Sugar syrup of different thread consistency is used in making different Indian sweets. Hardly anyone owns a thermometer. You will often find the term tar or wire described in Indian sweet recipes, like 1 wire syrup or 2 wire syrup or 3 wire syrup. Many people find this confusing. It is quite easy, if you follow the direction below.

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Ingredients

2 cups sugar
1 cup water

Instructions

1.Boil the water and sugar together in a pan, until sugar dissolves and it becomes bubbly. Turn heat down to keep it bubbling gently.
2.Dip the spatula in the syrup, lift it out, touch it with the tip of your forefinger to pick a drop of syrup. Be very careful, it can burn your finger! Touch your forefinger with your thumb and pull apart slowly, to see how many threads are stretched between your finger and thumb. Turn heat off as soon as desired threads are reached.
3.Single Thread syrup is approximately 220F - 222F/104-105C and is used for sweets where it needs to be absorbed, like Gulab Jamuns, Shahi Toast and Chumchums.
4.Two thread or soft ball syrup is approximately 235F - 240F/112C-115C, softball stage in candy making terms and used for making sweets that need sugar to set, like Burfi and Gunjia and Shakar Pare. It is mainly needed for Indian sweets using Mawa or Khoya. You just need to continue simmering the one thread syrup further, to get to two wires.
5.Three wire syrup is approximately 250F/121C-265F/130C, the hard ball stage in used in candy making to make boora, the Indian ground sugar. To test, either stretch between your forefinger and thumb or drop it on a cold plate and roll it between your fonger and thumb. Iit will roll into a hard ball.

Notes

Be careful when touching hot syrup with your fingers. It is best done using a wooden spatula. Give it a few seconds to cool, before touching.

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